Prophylactic self-isolation for Sage tincture preparation. Day 107th.

Overture

“I like growing herbs, but what actually t do with them later? I do not need that much…”

my friend said me…

Here is a great idea for how to use sage plant after (or during) a summer season. Really, what could one make from sage leaves? The answer:

Air freshener! or Armpit deodorant!

100% satisfaction and less chemical additives in your space. Sounds great, isn’t it? Home-made sage air freshener is a great tool to neutralize an air in a toilet! Self-made sage deodorant is a great alternative for commercial products with long ingredient lists!

Know the names!

The name of sage in Latin is Salvia officinalis

Recipe

Sage freshener or Sage deodorant – as you wish. Composition

Ingredients:

Dried sage leaves 50 g
Ethanol 70°500 ml
Ingredients for sage tincture preparation

The ratio of sage dried leaves to ethanol should be 10:100

How to make it?

  1. Cut the stems of sage plant, bound them together and let to dry indoor for few days
  2. Remove dried leaves from the stems
  3. Mill dried sage leaves in a coffee mill or shred manually into small pieces
  4. Transfer milled leaves into a glass bottle or glass jar with a wide neck and add ethanol
  5. Mix gently and let it stay for 7 days in dark cool place like a draw (no refrigerator needed, it should be just a place away from heating)
  6. During these 7 days, mix the mixture gently time to time to ensure better saturation
  7. After 7 days, strain the mixture through gauze cloth
  8. Keep the ready liquid in a clean glass jar or bottle, and use small amounts to fill in a sprayer

Important notes:

  • Sorry guys, not possible to convey odor online! Sage smells amazing!
  • In pharmaceutical science, sage is known as antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. One encyclopedia describes sage to be useful for treating bad smell of armpits (according to folk medicine). Sorry guys, no reference here I just know it because I read about it years ago:)
  • Some sources recommend to burn dry sage leaves to clean the air (1). However, preparing a tincture has its big advantage: the procedure is safe if compared with “burning” method. More so, you make it once and it lasts for month(s).

“Burning sage is one of the oldest and purest methods of cleansing a person, group of people, or space and of getting rid of unwanted spirits. The practice dates back to prehistoric times and it’s been documented as having been used in every corner of the world by our ancestors.”

How to Energetically Clear Your Space With Sage (1)
  • In pharmaceutical science, the ratio of herbal material and ethanol is important. Herein, the ratio 10:100 is a golden standard (however, with some additional conditions which are not mentioned here)
  • In pharmaceutical science, the procedure of saturation of ethanol with herbal material is called maceration extraction. It is conducted at room temperature and assume immersing a plant material in a liquid. A plant material should be cut into pieces to ensure better extraction
  • Thinking on how to dry the leaves? Here is a simple way to do it:
Drying sage leaves

References:

  1. How to Energetically Clear Your Space With Sage by Brook Bobb on https://www.vogue.com/article/sage-how-to-cleanse-energy-home-office-smudging

Photos by Dr. A. Palatronis on www.z-antenna.com

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Prophylactic self-isolation for face rejuvenation. Day 93rd

Instead of all the possible make-up removers – use this simple method!

Overture

Face skin rejuvenation starts by itself, repeatedly, again and again, during night time. Face skin should be clean – that is all what needed for skin to be well-looking.

So much is already said about coconut oil and its benefits for skin. Lets make it real!

Recipe

Set for face cleaning: cotton pads, coconut oil, cotton face towel. Photo by Dr. A. Palatronis on www.z-antenna.com

Ingredients:

  • coconut oil
  • cotton pads
  • small face towel
  • warm-to-hot water (40 Celsius degree)

How to clean the skin in the evening?

  1. remove skin impurities and make-up by using cotton pads with coconut oil on it
    1. for eye make up: close the eye, apply cotton pad with coconut oil to the eye, count till 5 and wipe over the eye gently
  2. wipe gently with cotton pad and coconut oil all the face and neck skin. It is all greasy now, right?
  3. soak a face towel in warm-to-hot water (40 Celsius degree only!) and wipe the skin firmly but gently to clean all the coconut grease
  4. spray the skin with spring water, rose water or just purified water for refreshment

Important notes:

  • Warm-to-hot water should not burn the skin, I choose the temperature which is not warm for the skin, but a little bit hot to touch. A little bit. Take care!
  • Use warm-to-hot tap water or purified water which was warmed up
  • Use organic cotton face towel
  • In general, this is a good way to avoid additional chemicals on the skin and inside the body, because everything goes inside, but nobody tracks that steps…

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Prophylactic self-isolation for face rejuvenation. Day 46th.

Self-sufficient face rejuvenation. Part 2.

Lets kick off the forthright concept of “good cream” and “bad cream” and just continue going deeper in l’earning about the essence (ingredients) of the face cream. We earn what we l’earn, right?:)

In a cream composition, emulsifier joints lipids and water. When applied on skin, an emulsifier joints to the lipid layers of skin too, and “emulsifies” it, bringing “chemically-boosted water” to the surface and deeper skin layers. Literally, a cream emulsifier grabs the existing natural face lipids, and therefore, grabs most of a natural face lipids with time. Emulsifiers dry out skin and cause transepidermal water loss, so-called “wash-out effect”. That is why it seems skin requires a cream constantly. Not surprising – a cream emulsifier has already made its destructive job and grabbed the natural resources of the face. An emulsifier is something, that is necessary for a cream, but not for a Nature-designed face skin. For the lovers of commercial “natural” cosmetics, here are just few examples of “natural” emulsifiers: cetearyl alcohol and cetearyl glucoside, sorbitan olivate, cetearyl olivate. I would probably agree that those substances are derived from natural raw materials (?), however, those substances are already chemically transferred to something unnatural, isn’t it? Emulsifiers are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

You can find a professional and informative description of emulsifiers in skin care on the website of International Association for Applied Corneotherapy: https://www.corneotherapy.org/articles/226-emulsifiers-in-skin-care

Emulsifiers are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

As water is a good environment for bacteria to grow, preservatives are added to the cream formula. Preservatives are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Preservatives are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

As chemical or “natural” fatty substances in a composition of a cream are usually smell nothing or unpleasant – flavors are added. Flavor regulators are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Flavor regulators are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Chemical creams require chemical cleansing, right? Later in the evening, we use lotions and face cleaning solutions (who has read the composition of those?:)) And once again, many components of a standard cream are good for an appearance and well-being of a cream, but nothing related to well-being of skin. Those ingredients interconnect with skin, a vital largest organ of a body, and promote a life-long addiction to them by grabbing the natural and offering the chemical. It is like a waterspout, I would call it a chemo-spout, it takes you swiftly and deep deeper into it, there seems to be no chance to get out.

Many components of a standard cream are good for an appearance and well-being of a cream, but nothing related to well-being of skin

Dr. A. Palatronis

More so, who knows how much chemically-boosted substances are penetrating into our bloodstream within the decades of usage? If skin barrier functions have been disrupted by emulsifiers, then a proper barrier against chemically-boosted substances no longer exist.

We talked about emollient and emulsifier in part 1 of self-face rejuvenation post:

https://z-antenna.com/2020/04/26/prophylactic-self-isolation-for-face-rejuvenation-day-45th/

To be continued…

P.S. Warm thanks to a special friend for editing

Photo of rose by Pexels

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Prophylactic self-isolation for face rejuvenation. Day 45th.

Self-sufficient face rejuvenation. Part 1.

Lets kick off a forthright concept of “good cream” and “bad cream” and just go deeper in l’earning about the essence (ingredients) of a face cream. We earn what we l’earn, right?:)

In the current era, where millions of women are reliant on face creams (invisible face masks?:), a need to regain a natural well-feeling and well-being of the skin is vital, isn’t it? Face cream makes skin smooth and hydrated; and the bond between commercial creams and our faces is firm and unbreakable. Why is that? How come that a Nature-designed body, Nature-designed skin is addicted to man-made creams? The answer would (and should) probably be ambiguous.

However, a few aspects of skin cream addiction (?) could be clarified right here, right now.

Have you ever tried to apply pure lipids – a substance without water (any plant oil, cacao butter, coconut oil, jojoba oil (which actually is a liquid wax:)), shea butter, lanolin, ghee butter, etc) – on skin? If yes, you can confirm that lipid-to-face contact is not smooth and leaves a greasy feeling on skin.

Have you ever tried to apply water on skin? Funny:) Water runs away, no way to apply it on skin and ensure hydration by doing that.

If to make it very simple – the basis of a cream are lipids (emollient is a chemical name for it), water, and a water-lipid connector (emulsifier is a chemical name for it). Main function of a face cream is to hydrate the skin. Hydrated means “cause to absorb water”.

Hydrated means “cause to absorb water”

Emollient moistens and hydrates skin.

Emollient moistens and hydrates skin. The question is, if hydration means “cause to absorb water”, then, what kind of water will be absorbed? Water from a cream composition? Water from deeper layers of skin? Consumed water? Which water will be absorbed?

The question is, if hydration means “cause to absorb water”, then, what kind of water will be absorbed?

The answer (1): Water from a cream composition would be absorbed.

One should realize the true fact: when water goes into contact with other substances, it is no longer water, it is a solution, a liquid with few or many other ingredients diluted in it. We do not drink water from a face cream when thirsty, you can not see water, but it supposed to be there, right?:) In a standard 50 ml tube of a face cream, water usually will be the first ingredient on the list, that means its amount is highest. Water content could vary from 20% to 75% of total amount of the cream ingredients. For example, if amount of water in a cream is 50%, that means in a whole tube there is 25 ml of water, “chemically boosted water”. Please measure with a measuring cup an amount of 25 ml and think if this amount will be sufficient to ensure “chemical” hydration of a face within a month? To conclude, a cream with a function to hydrate one’s skin needs WATER.

The answer (2): Water from deeper layers of skin.

Well, if external water supply is “chemically-boosted” or/and there is an extremely insufficient amount of its daily intake, then what? Natural, vital water from deeper skin layers would be taken to the surface because attracted by emollients, unnaturally, by force.

The answer (3): Consumed water.

That is great to drink lots of water, because everybody knows that a body consists of 60-70-80% of water. Everybody knows it. Funny, but this statement was made long before we started to fill in our bodies forcefully with 2-3-4 liters of water on a daily basis:) Have you noticed, a body keeps itself hydrated and feeling well if not using it as a container of water-sucking substances like salt, sugar and caffeine. More so, extensive consumption of water burdens kidney, heart, brain, washes out microelements, causes swollen face (because cells are “diving” in water), boosts a body with chemicals (is your water purified?), etc., etc.

Have noticed, a body keeps itself hydrated and feeling well if not using it as a container of water-sucking substances like salt, sugar and caffeine.

The same emollient plays a role of emulsifier.

The same emollient plays a role of an emulsifier (most commonly, but not always). In a cream composition, an emulsifier joins lipids and water into ONE. This is necessary to keep lipids and water together in a cream bottle for a long time for preservation purposes, usually from 6 months up to 3 years.

Here is the list of emollients and emulsifiers (1). Most commonly used are marked in bold.

Emollients

Emulsifiers

  • almond oil
  • aluminum stearate
  • canola oil
  • castor oil
  • ceratonia extract
  • cetostearyl alcohol
  • cetyl alcohol
  • cetyl esters wax
  • cholesterol
  • coconut oil
  • cottonseed oil
  • cyclomethicone
  • dibutyl sebacate
  • dimethicone
  • ethylene glycol palmitostearate
  • glycerin
  • glycerin monostearate
  • glyceryl monooleate
  • glyceryl monostearate
  • isopropyl myristate
  • isopropyl palmitate
  • lanolin
  • lecithin
  • light mineral oil
  • medium-chain triglycerides
  • mineral oil
  • mineral oil and lanolin alcohols
  • myristyl alcohol
  • octyldodecanol
  • oleyl alcohol
  • petrolatum
  • petrolatum and lanolin alcohols
  • safflower glycerides
  • safflower oil
  • soybean oil
  • stearyl alcohol
  • sunflower oil
  • tricaprylin
  • triolein
  • xylitol
  • zinc acetate
  • acacia
  • agar
  • anionic emulsifying wax
  • calcium alginate
  • calcium stearate
  • carbomers
  • carboxymethylcellulose calcium
  • carrageenan
  • cetostearyl alcohol
  • cetyl alcohol
  • cholesterol
  • diethanolamine
  • ethylene glycol palmitostearate
  • glycerin monostearate
  • glyceryl monooleate
  • hectorite
  • hydroxypropyl cellulose
  • hydroxypropyl starch
  • hypromellose
  • lanolin
  • hydrous
  • lanolin alcohols
  • lauric acid
  • lecithin
  • linoleic acid
  • medium-chain triglycerides
  • methylcellulose
  • mineral oil and lanolin alcohols
  • monobasic sodium phosphate
  • monoethanolamine
  • myristic acid
  • nonionic emulsifying wax
  • octyldodecanol
  • oleic acid
  • oleyl alcohol
  • palmitic acid
  • pectin
  • phospholipids
  • poloxamer
  • polycarbophil
  • polyoxyethylene alkyl ethers
  • polyoxyethylene castor oil derivatives
  • polyoxyethylene sorbitan fatty acid esters
  • polyoxyethylene stearates
  • polyoxylglycerides
  • potassium alginate
  • propylene glycol alginate
  • safflower glycerides
  • saponite
  • self-emulsifying glyceryl monostearate
  • sodium borate
  • sodium citrate dihydrate
  • sodium lactate
  • sodium lauryl sulfate
  • sorbitan esters
  • stearic acid
  • sunflower oil
  • tragacanth
  • triethanolamine
  • vitamin E polyethylene glycol succinate
  • xanthan gum

Find yours in your face cream formula!

(home work:))

To be continued…

Reference:

(1) Handbook-of-Pharmaceutical-Excipients 6th Edition by Rowe, R.C., Sheskey, P. and Quinn, M., 2009

Warm thanks to a special friend for editing

Photo of rose by Pexels

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