Prophylactic self-isolation for face rejuvenation. Day 46th.

Self-sufficient face rejuvenation. Part 2.

Lets kick off the forthright concept of “good cream” and “bad cream” and just continue going deeper in l’earning about the essence (ingredients) of the face cream. We earn what we l’earn, right?:)

In a cream composition, emulsifier joints lipids and water. When applied on skin, an emulsifier joints to the lipid layers of skin too, and “emulsifies” it, bringing “chemically-boosted water” to the surface and deeper skin layers. Literally, a cream emulsifier grabs the existing natural face lipids, and therefore, grabs most of a natural face lipids with time. Emulsifiers dry out skin and cause transepidermal water loss, so-called “wash-out effect”. That is why it seems skin requires a cream constantly. Not surprising – a cream emulsifier has already made its destructive job and grabbed the natural resources of the face. An emulsifier is something, that is necessary for a cream, but not for a Nature-designed face skin. For the lovers of commercial “natural” cosmetics, here are just few examples of “natural” emulsifiers: cetearyl alcohol and cetearyl glucoside, sorbitan olivate, cetearyl olivate. I would probably agree that those substances are derived from natural raw materials (?), however, those substances are already chemically transferred to something unnatural, isn’t it? Emulsifiers are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

You can find a professional and informative description of emulsifiers in skin care on the website of International Association for Applied Corneotherapy: https://www.corneotherapy.org/articles/226-emulsifiers-in-skin-care

Emulsifiers are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

As water is a good environment for bacteria to grow, preservatives are added to the cream formula. Preservatives are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Preservatives are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

As chemical or “natural” fatty substances in a composition of a cream are usually smell nothing or unpleasant – flavors are added. Flavor regulators are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Flavor regulators are an inevitability for a cream composition, not for skin.

Chemical creams require chemical cleansing, right? Later in the evening, we use lotions and face cleaning solutions (who has read the composition of those?:)) And once again, many components of a standard cream are good for an appearance and well-being of a cream, but nothing related to well-being of skin. Those ingredients interconnect with skin, a vital largest organ of a body, and promote a life-long addiction to them by grabbing the natural and offering the chemical. It is like a waterspout, I would call it a chemo-spout, it takes you swiftly and deep deeper into it, there seems to be no chance to get out.

Many components of a standard cream are good for an appearance and well-being of a cream, but nothing related to well-being of skin

Dr. A. Palatronis

More so, who knows how much chemically-boosted substances are penetrating into our bloodstream within the decades of usage? If skin barrier functions have been disrupted by emulsifiers, then a proper barrier against chemically-boosted substances no longer exist.

We talked about emollient and emulsifier in part 1 of self-face rejuvenation post:

https://z-antenna.com/2020/04/26/prophylactic-self-isolation-for-face-rejuvenation-day-45th/

To be continued…

P.S. Warm thanks to a special friend for editing

Photo of rose by Pexels

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Prophylactic self-isolation for skin rejuvenation. Day 47th.

Self-sufficient skin rejuvenation. Part 3.

Lets kick off a forthright concept of “good cream” and “bad cream” and just continue going deeper in l’earning about the essence of a cosmetic products. We earn what we l’earn, right?:)

Here is the composition of the real cosmetic product, body and face oil, supposed to be as natural as possible – 96% of the ingredients are of natural origin! Lets dive deep into it and see what is really what:) The ingredients, which we will discuss here today are marked with numbers from 1 to 8:

1. Contains at least 96% natural ingredients

That means, at least 4% are not natural. Therefore, it is important to identify and l’earn about not natural, synthetic ingredients some basic knowledge because only in this way it is possible to decide for yourself: “Do I really need THIS product, or lets search for other (or lets make my own at home:))”. It is something that we would apply to ourselves daily for good, not for the fight between vital skin and unknown chemicals, right?

2. No preservatives

In a body oil composition it is very predictable to have no preservatives, because the product does not contain water. Only water (as a vital solution) creates such a great possibility for microorganisms, germs, etc., to grow.

3. Coco-Caprylate/Caprate

  • Skin conditioning agent and emollient
  • Is it natural? No
  • Is it safe? Safe in the present practices of use
  • Is it of natural origin? Yes, small part of it is of natural origin, however the initial natural raw material no longer exists in the coco-caprylate/caprate.
  • How was it obtained? (In a chemical language): The mixture of esters obtained from the reaction of the fatty alcohols derived from coconut alcohol with a mixture of caprylic acid and capric acid. It is a mixture of esters of coconut alcohol with caprylic acid and capric acid (1):

Blog author’s NOTE: Coconut oil contains caprylic acid (5-11%) and capric acid (4-9%) (2). But, as it is clearly written in the description, only esters of Coconut Alcohol are of coconut origin. That means, that in the coco-caprylate/caprate production caprylic and capric acids are not of natural origin (they are synthetic). It is most likely to be truth, because concentration of caprylic and capric acids in coconuts is small and therefore the overall production of coco-caprylate/caprate substance would be irrational and unprofitable.

4. Dicaprylyl ether /Dioctyl ether or Cetiol® OE/

  • Emollient, Solvent and Skin conditioner. Provides a dry and non-greasy feel to the skin, has fast spreading capabilities, and thus facilitates the spreadability of many slow spreading ingredients (like pure vegetable oils or oil extracts).
  • Is it natural? No
  • Is it of natural origin? Yes, it is derived from caprylic acid, a fatty acid found in coconut or palm kernel oils. However the initial natural raw material no longer exists in the dicaprylyl ether. (In a chemical language): The fatty acids from the oils are esterified and then distilled to separate the capryl alcohol.  Etherification (dehydration) is then done to the capryl alcohol to form dicaprylyl ether and water.
  • Is it safe? Assumed as non-irritating to skin. But, the product has not been tested for reproductive, developmental, etc. toxicity (3, 4, 5, 6).

5. Tocopherol

Generally assumed as vitamin E, a well-known antioxidant

6. Hypericum perforatum

  • Hypericum perforatum is the Latin name of common Saint John’s wort.
  • Is it safe? If the plant is used for cosmetic or medical purposes, intense UV-exposure should be avoided because the plant can cause photo-toxicity and/or skin sensibility (7). That means avoid to apply during late spring, summer and early autumn. Hypericum perforatum plant is created by Nature to be safe ONLY during winter time when Sun exposure is minimal.

Hypericum perforatum plant is created by Nature to be safe ONLY during winter time when Sun exposure is minimal.

7. Benzyl salicylate, linalool, limonene, citronellol, geraniol

All are fragrances. All of them could be of natural origin, however, in this composition they are synthetic because not marked with (*).

8. Natural origin

  • Natural origin does not mean the certain ingredient in the composition of the cosmetic product is natural

References:

  1. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Esters as Used in Cosmetics. Fiume MM et al, 2013 and 2015 at https://www.cir-safety.org/supplementaldoc/safety-assessment-alkyl-esters-used-cosmetics
  2. Handbook-of-Pharmaceutical-Excipients 6th Edition by Rowe, R.C., Sheskey, P. and Quinn, M., 2009
  3. Cetiol ® Safety Data Sheet at https://doc.chemipan.org/home/images/chemipan/document/product/certificate/CC/CC0316-Cetiol-OE/CC0316-MSDS-Cetiol-OE.pdf
  4. Web publication https://www.tomsofmaine.com/our-promise/ingredients/dicaprylyl-ether
  5. Web publication https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/market-research/dicaprylyl-ether-market.asp
  6. Web publication https://cosmetics.specialchem.com/inci/dicaprylyl-ether
  7. European Union herbal monograph on Hypericum perforatum L., herba (traditional use), European Medicines Agency, 2018, at https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/herbal-monograph/draft-european-union-herbal-monograph-hypericum-perforatum-l-herba-traditional-use-revision-1_en.pdf

To be continued…

P.S. Warm thanks to a special friend for editing

Photo of rose by Pexels

Schemes by Dr. A. Palatronis on www.z-antenna.com

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Prophylactic self-isolation for face rejuvenation. Day 45th.

Self-sufficient face rejuvenation. Part 1.

Lets kick off a forthright concept of “good cream” and “bad cream” and just go deeper in l’earning about the essence (ingredients) of a face cream. We earn what we l’earn, right?:)

In the current era, where millions of women are reliant on face creams (invisible face masks?:), a need to regain a natural well-feeling and well-being of the skin is vital, isn’t it? Face cream makes skin smooth and hydrated; and the bond between commercial creams and our faces is firm and unbreakable. Why is that? How come that a Nature-designed body, Nature-designed skin is addicted to man-made creams? The answer would (and should) probably be ambiguous.

However, a few aspects of skin cream addiction (?) could be clarified right here, right now.

Have you ever tried to apply pure lipids – a substance without water (any plant oil, cacao butter, coconut oil, jojoba oil (which actually is a liquid wax:)), shea butter, lanolin, ghee butter, etc) – on skin? If yes, you can confirm that lipid-to-face contact is not smooth and leaves a greasy feeling on skin.

Have you ever tried to apply water on skin? Funny:) Water runs away, no way to apply it on skin and ensure hydration by doing that.

If to make it very simple – the basis of a cream are lipids (emollient is a chemical name for it), water, and a water-lipid connector (emulsifier is a chemical name for it). Main function of a face cream is to hydrate the skin. Hydrated means “cause to absorb water”.

Hydrated means “cause to absorb water”

Emollient moistens and hydrates skin.

Emollient moistens and hydrates skin. The question is, if hydration means “cause to absorb water”, then, what kind of water will be absorbed? Water from a cream composition? Water from deeper layers of skin? Consumed water? Which water will be absorbed?

The question is, if hydration means “cause to absorb water”, then, what kind of water will be absorbed?

The answer (1): Water from a cream composition would be absorbed.

One should realize the true fact: when water goes into contact with other substances, it is no longer water, it is a solution, a liquid with few or many other ingredients diluted in it. We do not drink water from a face cream when thirsty, you can not see water, but it supposed to be there, right?:) In a standard 50 ml tube of a face cream, water usually will be the first ingredient on the list, that means its amount is highest. Water content could vary from 20% to 75% of total amount of the cream ingredients. For example, if amount of water in a cream is 50%, that means in a whole tube there is 25 ml of water, “chemically boosted water”. Please measure with a measuring cup an amount of 25 ml and think if this amount will be sufficient to ensure “chemical” hydration of a face within a month? To conclude, a cream with a function to hydrate one’s skin needs WATER.

The answer (2): Water from deeper layers of skin.

Well, if external water supply is “chemically-boosted” or/and there is an extremely insufficient amount of its daily intake, then what? Natural, vital water from deeper skin layers would be taken to the surface because attracted by emollients, unnaturally, by force.

The answer (3): Consumed water.

That is great to drink lots of water, because everybody knows that a body consists of 60-70-80% of water. Everybody knows it. Funny, but this statement was made long before we started to fill in our bodies forcefully with 2-3-4 liters of water on a daily basis:) Have you noticed, a body keeps itself hydrated and feeling well if not using it as a container of water-sucking substances like salt, sugar and caffeine. More so, extensive consumption of water burdens kidney, heart, brain, washes out microelements, causes swollen face (because cells are “diving” in water), boosts a body with chemicals (is your water purified?), etc., etc.

Have noticed, a body keeps itself hydrated and feeling well if not using it as a container of water-sucking substances like salt, sugar and caffeine.

The same emollient plays a role of emulsifier.

The same emollient plays a role of an emulsifier (most commonly, but not always). In a cream composition, an emulsifier joins lipids and water into ONE. This is necessary to keep lipids and water together in a cream bottle for a long time for preservation purposes, usually from 6 months up to 3 years.

Here is the list of emollients and emulsifiers (1). Most commonly used are marked in bold.

Emollients

Emulsifiers

  • almond oil
  • aluminum stearate
  • canola oil
  • castor oil
  • ceratonia extract
  • cetostearyl alcohol
  • cetyl alcohol
  • cetyl esters wax
  • cholesterol
  • coconut oil
  • cottonseed oil
  • cyclomethicone
  • dibutyl sebacate
  • dimethicone
  • ethylene glycol palmitostearate
  • glycerin
  • glycerin monostearate
  • glyceryl monooleate
  • glyceryl monostearate
  • isopropyl myristate
  • isopropyl palmitate
  • lanolin
  • lecithin
  • light mineral oil
  • medium-chain triglycerides
  • mineral oil
  • mineral oil and lanolin alcohols
  • myristyl alcohol
  • octyldodecanol
  • oleyl alcohol
  • petrolatum
  • petrolatum and lanolin alcohols
  • safflower glycerides
  • safflower oil
  • soybean oil
  • stearyl alcohol
  • sunflower oil
  • tricaprylin
  • triolein
  • xylitol
  • zinc acetate
  • acacia
  • agar
  • anionic emulsifying wax
  • calcium alginate
  • calcium stearate
  • carbomers
  • carboxymethylcellulose calcium
  • carrageenan
  • cetostearyl alcohol
  • cetyl alcohol
  • cholesterol
  • diethanolamine
  • ethylene glycol palmitostearate
  • glycerin monostearate
  • glyceryl monooleate
  • hectorite
  • hydroxypropyl cellulose
  • hydroxypropyl starch
  • hypromellose
  • lanolin
  • hydrous
  • lanolin alcohols
  • lauric acid
  • lecithin
  • linoleic acid
  • medium-chain triglycerides
  • methylcellulose
  • mineral oil and lanolin alcohols
  • monobasic sodium phosphate
  • monoethanolamine
  • myristic acid
  • nonionic emulsifying wax
  • octyldodecanol
  • oleic acid
  • oleyl alcohol
  • palmitic acid
  • pectin
  • phospholipids
  • poloxamer
  • polycarbophil
  • polyoxyethylene alkyl ethers
  • polyoxyethylene castor oil derivatives
  • polyoxyethylene sorbitan fatty acid esters
  • polyoxyethylene stearates
  • polyoxylglycerides
  • potassium alginate
  • propylene glycol alginate
  • safflower glycerides
  • saponite
  • self-emulsifying glyceryl monostearate
  • sodium borate
  • sodium citrate dihydrate
  • sodium lactate
  • sodium lauryl sulfate
  • sorbitan esters
  • stearic acid
  • sunflower oil
  • tragacanth
  • triethanolamine
  • vitamin E polyethylene glycol succinate
  • xanthan gum

Find yours in your face cream formula!

(home work:))

To be continued…

Reference:

(1) Handbook-of-Pharmaceutical-Excipients 6th Edition by Rowe, R.C., Sheskey, P. and Quinn, M., 2009

Warm thanks to a special friend for editing

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